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This is where I am

May 7, 2010

I really don’t know where to start, hence the lack of posting. This could be a little jumbled.

At the Opryland Hotel a few weeks ago

  • I am working with two organizations to help them apply for 501(c)(3) status. Not that I know what I’m doing, but I really want to learn and I am am truly enjoying the process. I thought that I was going to be taking someone else’s joy away by stepping in and doing all of this paperwork, so I was originally hesitant to jump in and help. It turns out, not everyone enjoys paperwork as much as I do. Now I realize how weird that sounds.
  • I love Twitter. I have learned so much by following people on twitter. I originally stayed away from it because I thought it was stupid, and just another website to tack on the list that will eventually disappear. Not so. It is awesome. I have connected with so many folks who I would never have met through blog surfing. We are all helping each other. Please follow me.
  • For the first time in my life, I feel closer to being “settled”. I am slowly becoming more secure in my friendships, more confident in myself, more free to live abundantly, and more ready to do whatever it takes to follow Christ. This is awesome. God, please don’t take it away. This weekend I’m sharing my story with my church. How great is that? Great.
  • I don’t think I’ll ever forget what I thought when I woke up in the middle of the night last Saturday night. My bed is adjacent to an outside wall of the house, and I could feel sheets of rain pounding the house. My thought pattern went something like this, “That isn’t normal rain, those aren’t water drops. It’s like tubs of water being thrown on the house. Thank you, God, that I have a roof and four walls over my head. I feel so close to the water right now, and so safe but unsafe. Oh no, I have homeless friends who are out in this. God, please protect them! Rosco, please keep Rosco safe [He was]. Efrain, and so many more, without walls, help them! What is happening? Why was I woken up, storms don’t normally wake me up [occasionally, but I’m a heavy sleeper]. Thank you, God, for this home and providing for me. Please don’t abandon others.”
  • The rain lasted for two entire days. When I woke up on Sunday, water was rushing through the ditches in the street. A tree had fallen in the road. I later found out that the cross street was flooded due to the creek overflowing through the fairgrounds. It rose over ten feet. I kept calling my parents, to make sure it was real. I asked my mom to check CNN and other news, because she just had to see what was happening. She didn’t see any news. This made me feel like a disastrous flood wasn’t really happening. But it was, Josh Devine told me so, and I could see the water rising behind him.
Click for more “after” pictures from Stephen Lee

When my parent’s house burned down, the greater community stepped in to help them. They had to sort through all of their belongings, find out what was salvageable (is that a word?), tear their house down, and rebuild it. It was an awful experience for them…but they were the only ones. Theirs was the only house

affected.

Nashville is (was?) under water. My friend, Mike, has likely lost his entire home. Only, in this case, he is not the only one. Hundreds of homes were under water. Hundreds.

Loss of home and belongings aren’t the only issues.

Businesses were destroyed. Work had to shut down for a few days, including the courts. This means that work is going to be backed up for weeks. Appointments had to be rescheduled. Data has to be secured. Looters have to be prevented. People can’t afford grief counseling when they have to buy a new car, a new bed, a new alarm clock, new sheets, new silverware, new shoes, new deodorant, new makeup, and new trash cans. Not to mention, they are out of work. Major conferences have to be rescheduled, after a year of planning. Banks are out of service, bridges are washed out. I think I’ll stop now, because this is one list that really doesn’t end.

The work will go on for awhile. Thankfully, hundreds are volunteering their time, money, ideas, resources. Those who lost, are not alone. This is a community, and we’ll get through it together.

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